pedagogy – blog.Bioethics.gov https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog The blog of the 2009 - 2017 Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues Mon, 09 Jan 2017 23:23:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 New Educational Module from the Bioethics Commission on Vulnerable Populations in Neuroscience Research Now Available https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/07/15/new-educational-module-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-vulnerable-populations-in-neuroscience-research-now-available/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/07/15/new-educational-module-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-vulnerable-populations-in-neuroscience-research-now-available/#respond Wed, 15 Jul 2015 16:39:33 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1667 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted a new educational module on its website, Bioethics.gov. The module on vulnerable populations accompanies the Bioethics Commission’s two-volume report Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 1) and Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2). Additional educational materials on vulnerable populations include a background module, as well as report-specific modules that accompany the Bioethics Commission reports: Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research and “Ethically Impossible”: STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948. Other topics covered by the Bioethics Commission’s educational modules include community engagement, compensation for research-related injury, informed consent, privacy, and research design.

The Vulnerable Populations in Gray Matters module focuses on vulnerability specifically in the context of neuroscience research. The module provides instructors with a description of the ways in which individuals with impaired consent capacity might be vulnerable. It describes circumstances that might make potential participants vulnerable, including desperation and imprisonment, which merit ethical consideration in neuroscience research. It also addresses additional protections researchers can employ to protect potentially vulnerable populations in research, including those with impaired consent capacity.

The educational modules produced by the Bioethics Commission are based on the contemporary ethical issues addressed by the Commission, and are designed to provide instructors with foundational information, ethical analysis, discussion questions, problem-based learning scenarios, exercises, and additional resources to support ethics education and the integration of bioethical analysis into coursework across disciplines.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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New Primer for Researchers on Neuroscience and Consent Capacity Now Available https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/06/24/new-primer-for-researchers-on-neuroscience-and-consent-capacity-now-available/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/06/24/new-primer-for-researchers-on-neuroscience-and-consent-capacity-now-available/#respond Wed, 24 Jun 2015 16:20:35 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1659 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new educational primer: this primer provides researchers with information on neuroscience and consent capacity. The module accompanies the Bioethics Commission’s two-volume report Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 1) and Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2).

The primer on neuroscience and consent capacity was designed to help researchers, especially those working in neuroscience, understand and implement the Bioethics Commission’s recommendations about responsibly including individuals with potentially impaired consent capacity in their studies. The primer will aid ethical decision making and help researchers consider and implement appropriate ethical safeguards throughout their work.

The primer consists of frequently asked questions, which help researchers understand whether they should include participants with impaired consent capacity in their studies, and how to do so ethically. It includes an explanation of the ethical considerations involved in enrolling such participants, catalogues relevant laws and regulations, and describes potential safeguards that could help protect participants. The primer directs researchers to the Gray Matters report for further in-depth reading about the topics covered in it.

In addition to this primer, other educational materials have been posted to accompany the Bioethics Commission’s work. Several other primers have been developed to accompany the Bioethics Commission’s 2014 report Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings. The goal of the primer series is to provide concise, understandable materials for researchers, clinicians, and other health care professionals looking to implement some of the Bioethics Commission’s recommendations in particular contexts.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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New Educational Module from the Bioethics Commission on Informed Consent in Neuroscience Now Available https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/19/new-educational-module-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-informed-consent-in-neuroscience-now-available/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/19/new-educational-module-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-informed-consent-in-neuroscience-now-available/#respond Tue, 19 May 2015 15:55:08 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1629 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new educational module on informed consent. The module accompanies the Bioethics Commission’s two-volume report Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 1) and Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2). The new Gray Matters module adds to the informed consent resources already produced by the Bioethics Commission. Additional materials on informed consent include a background module and four report-specific modules that accompany the Bioethics Commission reports Ethically Impossible: STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948, Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing, Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research, and Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings. Other topics covered by the Bioethics Commission’s educational modules include research design, privacy, community engagement, compensation for research-related injury, and vulnerable populations.

The Informed Consent in Gray Matters module provides a brief introduction to the concept of consent capacity; elaborates an ethical justification for responsibly including individuals with impaired consent capacity in neuroscience research; describes the current regulatory framework regarding human subjects research involving participants with impaired consent capacity; and describes additional ethical safeguards to protect vulnerable populations, including adults with impaired consent capacity.

All of the educational modules produced by the Bioethics Commission are based on the contemporary ethical issues addressed by the Commission, and are designed to provide instructors with foundational information, ethical analysis, discussion questions, problem-based learning scenarios, exercises, and additional resources to support ethics education and the integration of bioethical analysis into coursework across disciplines.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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New Education Materials from the Bioethics Commission on Research Design Now Available https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/12/new-education-materials-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-research-design-now-available/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/12/new-education-materials-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-research-design-now-available/#respond Tue, 12 May 2015 16:40:40 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1623 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new series of educational modules on research design. The materials on research design increase the breadth of topics covered by the Bioethics Commission’s educational resources. Previous topics include privacy, community engagement, compensation for research-related injury, informed consent, and vulnerable populations. The new series includes both a background module, and a module to accompany the Bioethics Commission’s Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 1).

The Research Design Background module provides a brief introduction to research design; relates research design to guiding ethical principles; describes practical and ethical considerations in research design generally; identifies design components and ethical considerations in randomized controlled trails for biomedical research with human participants specifically; and explains the relevant regulatory requirements and guidelines that promote ethical research design.

The Research Design in Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society module emphasizes the importance of integrating ethics early and explicitly throughout the research endeavor, including in the determination of research design; explains how foundational domains of ethical conduct support ethical research design; and provides examples of approaches to ethics integration in neuroscience research design.

All of the educational modules produced by the Bioethics Commission are based on the contemporary ethical issues addressed by the Commission, and are designed to provide instructors with foundational information, ethical analysis, discussion questions, problem-based learning scenarios, exercises, and additional resources to support ethics education and the integration of bioethical analysis into coursework across disciplines.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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The Bioethics Commission and Ethics Integration at All Levels https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/19/the-bioethics-commission-and-ethics-integration-at-all-levels/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/19/the-bioethics-commission-and-ethics-integration-at-all-levels/#respond Thu, 19 Feb 2015 17:15:58 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1573 This week, Research Analyst Elizabeth Fenton will present on behalf of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) at the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics Twenty-fourth Annual International Conference. The presentation is part of a four-day conference held by the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE), an organization founded to promote the advancement and teaching of practical and professional ethics. APPE’s annual conference has a number of different program tracks, including: bioethics, business ethics, environmental ethics, empirical ethics, media and journalism ethics, and research ethics.

Fenton’s presentation is part of the conference’s Bioethics track. Her presentation, “Bioethics Education: Presidential Bioethics Commission and Ethics Integration at all Levels and Across Disciplines,” highlights the Bioethics Commission’s pedagogical materials. Noting the need for improved resources to support ethics education, the Commission has committed to building a foundation of educational materials that can be used across a wide range of academic disciplines in a variety of settings using contemporary ethics issues. The educational materials produced by the Commission range from topic specific modules created to correspond to Commission reports, to primers for physicians, researchers, and patients; the Commission also offers Spanish translations for its materials related to its analysis of the unethical STD research conducted in the 1940s in Guatemala.

Fenton’s presentation will discuss the importance of integrating ethics into educational disciplines such as science, where ethical challenges frequently arise but where researchers might not have the skills or vocabulary needed to recognize or address them. Ethics integration promotes ethical conduct, professional responsibility, and engagement with the broader societal dimensions of research to enable thoughtful decision-making. The presentation will also highlight the need for further research to evaluate the best models for ethics integration.

“Ethics integration is very much a two-way street,” Fenton says. “It is a process in which experts in both ethics and science can become competent and literate in each other’s fields. When scientists develop a vocabulary for expressing ethical concerns, and ethicists have the scientific vocabulary to understand those concerns, both fields benefit.”

All educational materials developed by the Bioethics Commission are available for free on its website at www.bioethics.gov/education. Instructors are encouraged to access, use, and adapt the materials, provide feedback on their utility, and suggest improvements. We encourage comments or suggestions at education@bioethics.gov.

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New Education Materials from the Bioethics Commission on Privacy Now Available https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/12/02/new-education-materials-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-privacy-now-available/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/12/02/new-education-materials-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-privacy-now-available/#respond Tue, 02 Dec 2014 16:51:32 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1500 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new series of educational modules on privacy. The materials on privacy increase the breadth of topics covered by the Bioethics Commission’s educational resources; previous topics include community engagement, compensation for research-related injury, informed consent, and vulnerable populations. The new series includes a background module and one module to accompany the Bioethics Commission report Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing.

The “Privacy Background” module describes a brief history of privacy; provides definitions of privacy and related concepts; relates privacy to the Bioethics Commission’s guiding ethical principles; identifies how U.S. case law, U.S. statutory protection, and the European approach have contributed to legal notions of privacy; explains privacy concerns and protections for health information; and addresses challenges to the de-identification of health-related data.

The “Privacy in Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing” module describes the technique of whole genome sequencing and presents the privacy concerns related to whole genome sequencing. It identifies the ethical principles involved in reconciling individuals’ privacy and scientific progress in whole genome sequencing and explains the legal and policy considerations associated with protecting the privacy of individuals who contribute whole genome sequencing data and information to support scientific research.

All of the educational modules produced by the Bioethics Commission are based on the contemporary ethical issues addressed by the Commission, and are designed to provide instructors with foundational information, ethical analysis, discussion questions, problem-based learning scenarios, exercises, and additional resources to support ethics education and the integration of bioethical analysis into coursework across disciplines.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

 

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A Look at How M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Uses Bioethics Educational Materials https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/11/12/a-look-at-how-m-d-anderson-cancer-center-uses-bioethics-educational-materials/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/11/12/a-look-at-how-m-d-anderson-cancer-center-uses-bioethics-educational-materials/#respond Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:39:41 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1492 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) loves hearing from educators who use our pedagogical materials in traditional and nontraditional settings. As a part of its initiative to promote and enhance bioethics education, the Bioethics Commission has produced a library of educational materials to accompany its reports. The Commission aims to contribute to the tools that educators and students can draw upon, with the overall goal of enhancing bioethics education. Happily, many attendees at the recent American Society of Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) 2014 Annual Meeting reported incorporating these materials into their university lectures.

Colleen M. Gallagher, Ph.D., M.A., L.S.W., F.A.C.H.E., visited our booth at ASBH to tell us that she has used Bioethics Commission educational materials as a part of her curricula. Gallagher, the Chief and Executive Director of the Section of Integrated Ethics in Cancer Care and an Associate Professor, teaches clinical and research interns, fellows and trainees completing certificates in ethics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. She has used modules such as the Study Guide to “Ethically Impossible” STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948 and Vulnerable Populations in Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research for courses on research ethics and clinical trials.

“The Study Guide to ‘Ethically Impossible’ helps to guide conversations with our interns on the importance of balancing public health concerns with the needs of the individual,” said Gallagher. She had also used the format from the Study Guide to “Ethically Impossible” to discuss other cases of ethical misconduct in research.

Gallagher said she finds the division of Bioethics Commission educational material into specific topic areas, such as informed consent and vulnerable population, to be especially useful when discussing public health and social policy issues with her classes. “Ethics is very philosophical, and there’s often a lack of consistent methodologies available. The materials created by the Bioethics Commission break down ethics into topic areas with specific case studies and examples,” explained Gallagher. She then had students apply the issues raised in Commission reports and educational modules to population health concerns where they live. Many of her students are professionals who are continuing their educations online. Gallagher, noting the need for a variety of materials and modalities when teaching online courses, said she appreciates the range of resources produced by the Bioethics Commission. She also appreciates the ease with which her students can access the materials for free online.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are available for free use at bioethics.gov/education. If you have used Commission materials in your lectures, classes, or seminars and would like to provide feedback, please email education@bioethics.gov.

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“Engaging the Future Responsibly” with the Bioethics Commission https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/10/02/engaging-the-future-responsibly-with-the-bioethics-commission/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/10/02/engaging-the-future-responsibly-with-the-bioethics-commission/#respond Thu, 02 Oct 2014 17:12:41 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1440 Tomorrow, Misti Ault Anderson, M.S., M.A., research analyst at the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission), will offer a plenary speech on ethics integration at all levels of education at the 16th International Conference on Ethics Across the Curriculum. The conference, sponsored by the Society for Ethics Across the Curriculum, will be held October 3-4 in Scottsdale, Arizona. The theme of this year’s conference is “Engaging the Future Responsibly,” with topics ranging from ethics in engineering and technology, to health sciences and graduate education.

Noting the need for improved educational materials to support ethics instruction in traditional and nontraditional educational settings, the Commission has committed to building a foundation of educational materials that can be used across a wide range of academic disciplines. Over the past five months, the Commission released three additional sets of educational materials, including a conversation series and primers on the ethical management of incidental findings in various contexts, and educational modules on vulnerable populations and compensation for research-related injury. These materials add to the Commission’s growing library of educational resources. In addition, the Commission recently announced its next report will focus on deliberation and education.

Anderson will point out that this commission is the first national level bioethics commission in the United States to develop educational materials around the contemporary issues addressed in its reports, many of which include recommendations encouraging increased and improved ethics education. The Commission’s expanding collection of educational materials reflects its commitment to support ethics education actively. All educational materials developed by the Commission are available for free on its website at www.bioethics.gov/education. Instructors are encouraged to access and use the materials, provide feedback on their utility, and suggest improvements. Comments or suggestions should be sent to education@bioethics.gov.

“Empirical research is still needed on approaches to integrating ethics at all levels of education, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional training,” said Anderson. “The Bioethics Commission encourages the academic community to advance this research, with the goal of strengthening ethics education across the curriculum because engaging the future responsibly starts with educating current and future professionals about ethical responsibility.”

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New Educational Modules on Vulnerable Populations https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/09/05/new-educational-modules-on-vulnerable-populations/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/09/05/new-educational-modules-on-vulnerable-populations/#respond Fri, 05 Sep 2014 16:00:35 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1405 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted a new series of educational modules on vulnerable populations on its website, Bioethics.gov. These include a background module on vulnerable populations, as well as report-specific modules on vulnerable populations in two Bioethics Commission Reports: Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research and “Ethically Impossible”: STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948.

The “Vulnerable Populations Background” module describes vulnerability and how the term “vulnerable populations” is traditionally defined; provides historical examples of research that exploited vulnerable populations; explores ethical principles applicable to research with vulnerable populations; and identifies various codes of conduct, guidelines, and regulations that shaped human subjects research protections generally, and protections for research with vulnerable populations specifically. To illustrate the history of human subjects research and the emergence of special protections for vulnerable populations, the module also includes a timeline of notable research and related events.

The “Vulnerable Populations in Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research” module focuses on children as a vulnerable population generally, and on pediatric medical countermeasure (MCM) research specifically. This module provides instructors with an explanation of the ways that children are vulnerable; current regulations for protecting children in pediatric research, including the Bioethics Commission’s ethical framework to guide national-level review of pediatric MCM research when appropriate; as well as scientific, practical, and ethical challenges of conducting MCM research with children.

The third module highlights the Bioethics Commission’s analysis on vulnerable populations in “Ethically Impossible”: STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948.” The experiments in Guatemala involved the intentional exposure of vulnerable populations—prisoners, soldiers, psychiatric patients, and commercial sex workers—to sexually transmitted diseases without their consent. For guided readings and discussion questions about vulnerable populations in the U.S. Public Health Service STD research studies in Guatemala, the module refers instructors to A Study Guide to “Ethically Impossible” STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948.

All of the vulnerable populations modules are based on the contemporary issues addressed by the Bioethics Commission and aim to provide instructors with foundational information, ethical reasoning, applications, questions, discussion points, and additional readings to support ethics education and integrate bioethical analysis into existing curricula across disciplines.

Future modules on vulnerable populations will integrate other reports from the Bioethics Commission.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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Commission to Formally Take up Issue of Bioethics Education: Builds Growing Body of Educational Materials https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/08/21/commission-to-formally-take-up-issue-of-bioethics-education-builds-growing-body-of-educational-materials/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/08/21/commission-to-formally-take-up-issue-of-bioethics-education-builds-growing-body-of-educational-materials/#respond Thu, 21 Aug 2014 16:01:27 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1396 At Wednesday’s public meeting of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission), Amy Gutmann, Ph.D., Commission Chair, announced that the Commission’s next topic would integrate education and deliberation.

“I am pleased to announce that we will begin work on a new project in the coming months: a report that will integrate two overarching themes of our work – education and deliberation. We will focus on their symbiotic relationship as twin pillars of public bioethics. Education is required for informed deliberation, and deliberation enhances education at all levels,” Gutmann said. “We are well positioned to make an important contribution in this area, and I look forward to working with all of you on it.”

The Bioethics Commission has noted the need for bioethics education improvement in many of its reports. A formal report with recommendations, plus continuing to develop easily accessible and free materials based on the Commission’s own analysis are efforts to help meet that need. The Commission believes that given the multidisciplinary nature of science and research, bioethics education should be available to a wide variety of disciplines at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels.

It has been almost a year since the Bioethics Commission introduced its first educational modules based on contemporary issues addressed by the Commission. Since it posted that first round Commission staff has produced more than 15 modules and primers based on five Commission reports.

The materials are free for use by educators and professionals in traditional and non-traditional settings across a variety of fields. Additional modules in the Bioethics Commission’s pipeline will add to the growing body of pedagogical materials the Bioethics Commission has developed to support bioethics education. New modules will explore topics such as vulnerable populations, compensation for research-related injury, privacy, and research design in light of contemporary biomedical and scientific challenges. Like previous modules, future materials will facilitate teaching and discussion.

Vulnerable populations in human subjects research will be addressed by drawing from Bioethics Commission reports “Ethically Impossible” STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948 and Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research. “Ethically Impossible” examined the ethical violations that occurred during research on sexually transmitted diseases in Guatemala in the 1940s. In Safeguarding Children, the Commission advised the U.S. government on the ethical considerations involved in evaluating and conducting pediatric research on medical countermeasures responding to a bioterrorism attack.

In addition, compensation for participants who are injured as a result of their taking part in research will be highlighted in a second set of modules using Safeguarding Children and the report Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research. In Safeguarding Children, the Commission considered the importance of compensation in the context of pediatric medical countermeasure research. In Moral Science, the Bioethics Commission assessed contemporary standards that protect participants in human subjects research, including those concerning treatment and compensation for research-related injury.

Community engagement rounds out the set of new modules and is based on New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology and Emerging Technology. Before releasing New Directions, the Commission engaged with a wide variety of stakeholders to identify the appropriate ethical boundaries within the field of synthetic biology to maximize public benefits while minimizing harm. This module will add to an existing set of resources on community engagement from Moral Science and the report Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing. Additional module sets on privacy and research design are also planned to accompany the Commission’s reports Privacy and Progress and Safeguarding Children.

All of the educational materials released by the Bioethics Commission are versatile and can be used in many ways to integrate bioethics into course curricula, discussions, and professional development activities. This versatility underscores the Commission’s commitment to advancing bioethics education across the academic curriculum. Each module includes background information, learning objectives, discussion questions, suggested additional readings, and practice exercises to support instructors as they develop their presentations. For examples about how one module might be used to reach different class audiences, check out our webinar: “Multidisciplinary Implementation of Bioethics Commission Education Materials.”

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are freely available at www.bioethics.gov/education. Feedback on the materials is encouraged at education@bioethics.gov.

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