education – blog.Bioethics.gov https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog The blog of the 2009 - 2017 Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues Mon, 09 Jan 2017 23:23:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Looking Back at the Bioethics Commission’s Blog https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/12/05/looking-back-at-the-bioethics-commissions-blog/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/12/05/looking-back-at-the-bioethics-commissions-blog/#respond Mon, 05 Dec 2016 16:00:04 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2125 Throughout its tenure, the Bioethics Commission has maintained an active digital presence to connect with a global audience. A major component of this has been through its blog. This final blog post reflects on the role the blog has played in disseminating the Bioethics Commission’s work.first-blog

Former Bioethics Commission Executive Director Valerie Bonham launched the commission’s blog on November 15, 2010, announcing that the staff would be liveblogging during Meeting Three in Atlanta. From that meeting onward, Bioethics Commission staff continued to blog live from the Bioethics Commission’s meetings, held throughout the country in cities including Washington DC, Philadelphia, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, Chicago, and Boston. Meeting posts highlighted salient points of discussion as they occurred during the public meetings. For example, during Meeting Three, a blog post outlined the members’ deliberations regarding the risks and benefits of synthetic biology. During Meeting Eighteen, which focused on ethical issues in neuroscience, a blog post highlighted some of the discussion about the ethical challenges in neuroscience research. The Bioethics Commission also used blog posts to distill complex topics that arose during meetings. During Meeting Twelve, which focused on pediatric medical countermeasure research, a blog post presented a simplified structure of some of the federal regulations concerning pediatric research.

The commission’s blog also highlighted and explained the impact of the commission’s work. For example, during the commission’s tenure, a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to revise the Common Rule—the regulations that govern the ethical conduct of federally supported human subjects research—was published in the Federal Register on September 8, 2015. Elements of the commission’s work were included in this notice. In September and October 2015, the Bioethics Commission released a series of blog posts that described some of the relevant inclusions in the NPRM, and explained their significance.

The Bioethics Commission also used the blog to share its outreach activities and initiatives with a broad readership. For example, when Bioethics Commission staff attended the annual meeting of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities in October 2015, a blog post highlighted the commission’s outreach efforts, and included answers to frequently asked questions that staff members fielded while at the conference. When the Bioethics Commission presented at the White House BRAIN conference, a blog post shared Executive Director Lisa M. Lee’s remarks. On June 8, 2016, Col. Nelson Michael gave an interview with the bioethics news site BioEdge, and the Bioethics Commission staff wrote a two-part blog post on some of the issues Col. Michael raised regarding democratic deliberation and ethics education. Blog posts were also written to describe publications in academic journals by Commission members and staff. A blog post shared a commentary written by Bioethics Commission Vice Ch
air Dr. James Wagner, who wrote about the importance of early ethics education.

During its tenure, the Bioethics Commission produced over 65 educational materials, and used the blog to picture1announce the availability of new educational materials, including user guides, primers, classroom discussion guides, and deliberative scenarios. Blog posts also helped outline how to use the educational materials. Blog posts also highlighted topics including innovations in ethics education, and the importance of civic engagement. The Bioethics Commission also used the blog to announce and promote its podcast series Ethically Sound, a 10-episode series that focuses on some of the ethical issues raised in the commission’s reports.
Readers can access previous blog posts, educational materials, the podcast series Ethically Sound, along with all of the Bioethics Commission’s reports and related materials at bioethics.gov. On behalf of the Bioethics Commission, we thank our readers for their continued interest in the work of the commission.

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Roundtable Discussion: Improving Public Dialogue of Bioethics https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/27/roundtable-discussion-improving-public-dialogue-of-bioethics/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/27/roundtable-discussion-improving-public-dialogue-of-bioethics/#respond Wed, 27 May 2015 20:18:49 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1649 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) closed its discussion of democratic deliberation in bioethics and bioethics education with a roundtable discussion involving Commission members and presenters.

Amy Gutmann, Ph.D., Chair of the Bioethics Commission, kicked off the session by asking the panelists to share their thoughts on what the Bioethics Commission can do to improve the quality of public dialogue and deliberation on bioethics and the quality of bioethics education.

Following are highlights from the discussion:

Margaret Little, Ph.D., director of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and associate professor in the philosophy department at Georgetown University, suggested that the Bioethics Commission help launch a series of experiments to promote informed deliberation on bioethics, both at universities and in communities. “This is a great model that is used in many places. Right now, there is an energy prize for $5 million to a community that reduces its carbon footprint,” Little noted. “So this is something with incentives and an aspirational mandate.”

“Watching is one thing; doing is another,” said James Fishkin, Ph.D., the Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication and director of the Center for Deliberative Democracy at Stanford University. He urged the Bioethics Commission to undertake an exemplary project using democratic deliberation to spur public engagement in bioethics. “If you do it right, other commissions can follow in your footsteps,” he added.

F. Daniel Davis, Ph.D., the director of bioethics at the Geisinger Health System and former executive director of the President’s Council on Bioethics under President George W. Bush, said that there’s a need to make ethical knowledge more practical and less theoretical. He cited work he is doing with surgical residents, assessing their emotional intelligence as a way to reduce medical errors. The goal, he said, is to get the residents not only to recognize ethical issues but also to “operationalize that ethical knowledge and do so in a virtuous way.”

Jason Schwartz, Ph.D., M. Bioethics, the Harold T. Shapiro Fellow in Bioethics at the University Center for Human Values, Princeton University, asked the Bioethics Commission to think broadly in terms of the government entities that address bioethics issues. “Call attention to the fact that bioethics may not be the domain of bioethics alone,” he said, noting that many bodies that do not have bioethics in their name or mandate deal with bioethics issues. For example, bioethics is a factor in the how the Food and Drug Administration weighs the risks and benefits of pharmaceuticals, and in how vaccines are prioritized for development. “Ethical dimensions are largely ignored or cast aside or reshaped if they are exclusively technical or scientific questions,” Schwarz said.

Steven Joffe, M.D., M.P.H., the Vice Chair of Medical Ethics, Emanuel and Robert Hart Associate Professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy and director of Penn Fellowship in Advanced Biomedical Ethics at University of Pennsylvania, emphasized the importance of promoting respectful public dialogues. As a model, he suggested presidential debates in which questions are asked by citizens sitting in a circle. “The citizens equip themselves incredibly well time after time after time. And those sorts of discussions, engaging the public about bioethical issues, I think, would be…incredibly powerful to promote the conversations we want to have.”

Connie Ulrich, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., an associate professor of bioethics and nursing in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, cited a need for better communication. “Training and communication would absolutely help in bioethics education, so we can help people feel more confident to address the issues that they face.”

The Commission is scheduled to meet again on September 2 in Washington, D.C. For details, go to www.bioethics.gov.

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Bioethics Education from Three Viewpoints https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/27/bioethics-education-three-view-points/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/05/27/bioethics-education-three-view-points/#respond Wed, 27 May 2015 19:11:17 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1643 This afternoon, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) turned its attention to three approaches for teaching bioethics.

Emphasis on Empirical Methods

Steven Joffe, M.D., M.P.H., the vice chair of Medical Ethics, Emanuel and Robert Hart Associate Professor of Medical Ethics and Health Policy and director of Penn Fellowship in Advanced Biomedical Ethics at University of Pennsylvania, made the case for including empirical scholarship in the education of bioethicists. He identified two broad roles for empiricism in bioethics: to inform ethical analysis and to move from a moral vision to ethical behavior and effective, justifiable policy.

“High-quality, high-impact bioethics requires interdisciplinarity, translation to policy and practice, and grounding in nuanced appreciation of relevant empirical realities,” Joffe said.

Teaching Bioethics through Humanities

Margaret Little, Ph.D., is the director of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics and associate professor in the philosophy department at Georgetown University. Little described how novel approaches to bioethics education, such as the Kennedy Institute’s Conversations in Bioethics series, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), and its Ethics Lab, can help prepare students and the broader public to engage in dialogue and deliberation on topics in bioethics with significant public policy implications.

Each of these approaches has unique advantages. Through the university-wide conversations series, for example, students can gain exposure to experts with both deep knowledge and unique personal experience. Through MOOCs, “anyone with an internet connection can access the world’s experts on a variety of topics,” Little noted. And in the Ethics Lab, students use newly acquired knowledge to design real-world tools and interventions.

Bioethics Education through a Clinical Lens

Connie Ulrich, Ph.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., an associate professor of bioethics and nursing in the Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, explored the value of nursing to public discourse on ethical issues, the ethical issues that nurses encounter that require bioethics education, and the role of bioethics education in preparing the next generation of nursing professionals.

Ulrich said that nurses face complex and challenging ethical issues in clinical care, partly because of the time they spend directly with patients and their families. Yet only about half of nurses surveyed reported having had ethics education in their basic or advanced professional program, and 23 percent said they’d had no ethics education at all. This lack of preparedness can make nurses feel less confident and less likely to take action when faced with an ethical issue.

“Ethics preparedness can strengthen nurses’ ability to work collaboratively with other health care providers, build confidence to speak about ethics concerns related to patient care, and garner respect as valued members of the caregiving team,” Ulrich said.

Next, the Bioethics Commission will wrap up today’s meeting with a roundtable discussion.

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The Bioethics Commission and Ethics Integration at All Levels https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/19/the-bioethics-commission-and-ethics-integration-at-all-levels/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/19/the-bioethics-commission-and-ethics-integration-at-all-levels/#respond Thu, 19 Feb 2015 17:15:58 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1573 This week, Research Analyst Elizabeth Fenton will present on behalf of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) at the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics Twenty-fourth Annual International Conference. The presentation is part of a four-day conference held by the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE), an organization founded to promote the advancement and teaching of practical and professional ethics. APPE’s annual conference has a number of different program tracks, including: bioethics, business ethics, environmental ethics, empirical ethics, media and journalism ethics, and research ethics.

Fenton’s presentation is part of the conference’s Bioethics track. Her presentation, “Bioethics Education: Presidential Bioethics Commission and Ethics Integration at all Levels and Across Disciplines,” highlights the Bioethics Commission’s pedagogical materials. Noting the need for improved resources to support ethics education, the Commission has committed to building a foundation of educational materials that can be used across a wide range of academic disciplines in a variety of settings using contemporary ethics issues. The educational materials produced by the Commission range from topic specific modules created to correspond to Commission reports, to primers for physicians, researchers, and patients; the Commission also offers Spanish translations for its materials related to its analysis of the unethical STD research conducted in the 1940s in Guatemala.

Fenton’s presentation will discuss the importance of integrating ethics into educational disciplines such as science, where ethical challenges frequently arise but where researchers might not have the skills or vocabulary needed to recognize or address them. Ethics integration promotes ethical conduct, professional responsibility, and engagement with the broader societal dimensions of research to enable thoughtful decision-making. The presentation will also highlight the need for further research to evaluate the best models for ethics integration.

“Ethics integration is very much a two-way street,” Fenton says. “It is a process in which experts in both ethics and science can become competent and literate in each other’s fields. When scientists develop a vocabulary for expressing ethical concerns, and ethicists have the scientific vocabulary to understand those concerns, both fields benefit.”

All educational materials developed by the Bioethics Commission are available for free on its website at www.bioethics.gov/education. Instructors are encouraged to access, use, and adapt the materials, provide feedback on their utility, and suggest improvements. We encourage comments or suggestions at education@bioethics.gov.

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New Educational Module from the Bioethics Commission on Community Engagement in Synthetic Biology https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/13/new-educational-module-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-community-engagement-in-synthetic-biology/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/13/new-educational-module-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-community-engagement-in-synthetic-biology/#respond Fri, 13 Feb 2015 17:41:12 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1570 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new educational module on community engagement in the context of synthetic biology. The module integrates material from the Bioethics Commission’s report New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology and Emerging Technologies (New Directions).

The aim of this module is to help instructors understand how community engagement can impact technological development and application of synthetic biology and other emerging technologies, as well as the importance of democratic deliberation for addressing the use of such technologies. The module identifies guiding ethical principles and describes how they promote engagement with the public and with affected communities.

Through discussion questions, scenarios, and exercises, the module guides instructors to help students consider the differences between public engagement, community engagement, and community-engaged research, and offers a timely example of the engagement process in synthetic biology. Illustrative examples that highlight potential benefits and challenges of community engagement include the production of algal biofuels, use of synthetic chemicals in consumer products, and development of drugs using synthetic biology techniques.

This module is the latest addition to the Bioethics Commission’s series of modules on community engagement, which includes background material and modules discussing community engagement in the contexts of human subjects research protection and privacy in whole genome sequencing. This module is also the first that the Bioethics Commission has developed based on its report New Directions.

All of the Bioethics Commission’s educational modules are based on ethical questions addressed by the Commission and provide instructors with foundational information, ethical analysis, discussion questions, problem-based learning scenarios, exercises, and additional resources to support ethics education and the integration of bioethical analysis into coursework across disciplines.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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New Education Materials from the Bioethics Commission on Privacy Now Available https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/12/02/new-education-materials-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-privacy-now-available/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/12/02/new-education-materials-from-the-bioethics-commission-on-privacy-now-available/#respond Tue, 02 Dec 2014 16:51:32 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1500 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new series of educational modules on privacy. The materials on privacy increase the breadth of topics covered by the Bioethics Commission’s educational resources; previous topics include community engagement, compensation for research-related injury, informed consent, and vulnerable populations. The new series includes a background module and one module to accompany the Bioethics Commission report Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing.

The “Privacy Background” module describes a brief history of privacy; provides definitions of privacy and related concepts; relates privacy to the Bioethics Commission’s guiding ethical principles; identifies how U.S. case law, U.S. statutory protection, and the European approach have contributed to legal notions of privacy; explains privacy concerns and protections for health information; and addresses challenges to the de-identification of health-related data.

The “Privacy in Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing” module describes the technique of whole genome sequencing and presents the privacy concerns related to whole genome sequencing. It identifies the ethical principles involved in reconciling individuals’ privacy and scientific progress in whole genome sequencing and explains the legal and policy considerations associated with protecting the privacy of individuals who contribute whole genome sequencing data and information to support scientific research.

All of the educational modules produced by the Bioethics Commission are based on the contemporary ethical issues addressed by the Commission, and are designed to provide instructors with foundational information, ethical analysis, discussion questions, problem-based learning scenarios, exercises, and additional resources to support ethics education and the integration of bioethical analysis into coursework across disciplines.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

 

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A Look at How M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Uses Bioethics Educational Materials https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/11/12/a-look-at-how-m-d-anderson-cancer-center-uses-bioethics-educational-materials/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/11/12/a-look-at-how-m-d-anderson-cancer-center-uses-bioethics-educational-materials/#respond Wed, 12 Nov 2014 17:39:41 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1492 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) loves hearing from educators who use our pedagogical materials in traditional and nontraditional settings. As a part of its initiative to promote and enhance bioethics education, the Bioethics Commission has produced a library of educational materials to accompany its reports. The Commission aims to contribute to the tools that educators and students can draw upon, with the overall goal of enhancing bioethics education. Happily, many attendees at the recent American Society of Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) 2014 Annual Meeting reported incorporating these materials into their university lectures.

Colleen M. Gallagher, Ph.D., M.A., L.S.W., F.A.C.H.E., visited our booth at ASBH to tell us that she has used Bioethics Commission educational materials as a part of her curricula. Gallagher, the Chief and Executive Director of the Section of Integrated Ethics in Cancer Care and an Associate Professor, teaches clinical and research interns, fellows and trainees completing certificates in ethics at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX. She has used modules such as the Study Guide to “Ethically Impossible” STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948 and Vulnerable Populations in Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research for courses on research ethics and clinical trials.

“The Study Guide to ‘Ethically Impossible’ helps to guide conversations with our interns on the importance of balancing public health concerns with the needs of the individual,” said Gallagher. She had also used the format from the Study Guide to “Ethically Impossible” to discuss other cases of ethical misconduct in research.

Gallagher said she finds the division of Bioethics Commission educational material into specific topic areas, such as informed consent and vulnerable population, to be especially useful when discussing public health and social policy issues with her classes. “Ethics is very philosophical, and there’s often a lack of consistent methodologies available. The materials created by the Bioethics Commission break down ethics into topic areas with specific case studies and examples,” explained Gallagher. She then had students apply the issues raised in Commission reports and educational modules to population health concerns where they live. Many of her students are professionals who are continuing their educations online. Gallagher, noting the need for a variety of materials and modalities when teaching online courses, said she appreciates the range of resources produced by the Bioethics Commission. She also appreciates the ease with which her students can access the materials for free online.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are available for free use at bioethics.gov/education. If you have used Commission materials in your lectures, classes, or seminars and would like to provide feedback, please email education@bioethics.gov.

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New Education Materials on Compensation for Research-Related Injury https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/09/23/new-education-materials-on-compensation-for-research-related-injury/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/09/23/new-education-materials-on-compensation-for-research-related-injury/#respond Tue, 23 Sep 2014 15:04:34 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1420 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has posted to Bioethics.gov a new series of educational modules on compensation for research-related injury. The materials on compensation increase the breadth of topics the Bioethics Commission’s educational resources cover; previous topics include community engagement, informed consent, and vulnerable populations. The new series includes a background module and two modules specific to Bioethics Commission reports: Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research and Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research.

The “Compensation Background” module describes the goals of compensating individuals for research-related injury; provides ethical justification for compensation; discusses practical considerations, including informed consent and cost and feasibility; presents past U.S. historical context and advisory committee recommendations on compensation; and identifies current U.S. and international approaches to compensation. The module presents various models of compensation including insurance, personal insurance, specialty courts, and compensation funds.

The “Compensation in Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research” module presents the Bioethics Commission’s examination of treatment and compensation for research-related injury. The module explains the ethical principles that support, and addresses challenges associated with, providing treatment or compensation for research-related injuries. The module describes international requirements and guidance concerning treatment or compensation for research-related injury; leads instructors through different models for compensating participants for research-related injuries and some of the strengths and weaknesses of each; and addresses the difference between compensation for research-related injury and reparations for past unethical research.

The “Compensation in Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research” module focuses on compensation for research-related injury in the context of pediatric medical countermeasure (MCM) research. The module outlines the ethical principles that support providing treatment or compensation for research-related injuries that arise from pediatric MCM research; describes the different arguments for treating or compensating injured adults and injured pediatric research participants; and addresses the various ways injured pediatric MCM research participants can seek treatment or compensation and the strengths and limitations of these approaches.

All of the learning modules are based on ethical questions addressed by the Bioethics Commission and provide instructors with foundational information, ethical analysis, discussion questions, problem-based learning scenarios, exercises, and additional resources to support ethics education and the integration of bioethical analysis into coursework across disciplines.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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Commission to Formally Take up Issue of Bioethics Education: Builds Growing Body of Educational Materials https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/08/21/commission-to-formally-take-up-issue-of-bioethics-education-builds-growing-body-of-educational-materials/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/08/21/commission-to-formally-take-up-issue-of-bioethics-education-builds-growing-body-of-educational-materials/#respond Thu, 21 Aug 2014 16:01:27 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1396 At Wednesday’s public meeting of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission), Amy Gutmann, Ph.D., Commission Chair, announced that the Commission’s next topic would integrate education and deliberation.

“I am pleased to announce that we will begin work on a new project in the coming months: a report that will integrate two overarching themes of our work – education and deliberation. We will focus on their symbiotic relationship as twin pillars of public bioethics. Education is required for informed deliberation, and deliberation enhances education at all levels,” Gutmann said. “We are well positioned to make an important contribution in this area, and I look forward to working with all of you on it.”

The Bioethics Commission has noted the need for bioethics education improvement in many of its reports. A formal report with recommendations, plus continuing to develop easily accessible and free materials based on the Commission’s own analysis are efforts to help meet that need. The Commission believes that given the multidisciplinary nature of science and research, bioethics education should be available to a wide variety of disciplines at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels.

It has been almost a year since the Bioethics Commission introduced its first educational modules based on contemporary issues addressed by the Commission. Since it posted that first round Commission staff has produced more than 15 modules and primers based on five Commission reports.

The materials are free for use by educators and professionals in traditional and non-traditional settings across a variety of fields. Additional modules in the Bioethics Commission’s pipeline will add to the growing body of pedagogical materials the Bioethics Commission has developed to support bioethics education. New modules will explore topics such as vulnerable populations, compensation for research-related injury, privacy, and research design in light of contemporary biomedical and scientific challenges. Like previous modules, future materials will facilitate teaching and discussion.

Vulnerable populations in human subjects research will be addressed by drawing from Bioethics Commission reports “Ethically Impossible” STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948 and Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research. “Ethically Impossible” examined the ethical violations that occurred during research on sexually transmitted diseases in Guatemala in the 1940s. In Safeguarding Children, the Commission advised the U.S. government on the ethical considerations involved in evaluating and conducting pediatric research on medical countermeasures responding to a bioterrorism attack.

In addition, compensation for participants who are injured as a result of their taking part in research will be highlighted in a second set of modules using Safeguarding Children and the report Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research. In Safeguarding Children, the Commission considered the importance of compensation in the context of pediatric medical countermeasure research. In Moral Science, the Bioethics Commission assessed contemporary standards that protect participants in human subjects research, including those concerning treatment and compensation for research-related injury.

Community engagement rounds out the set of new modules and is based on New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology and Emerging Technology. Before releasing New Directions, the Commission engaged with a wide variety of stakeholders to identify the appropriate ethical boundaries within the field of synthetic biology to maximize public benefits while minimizing harm. This module will add to an existing set of resources on community engagement from Moral Science and the report Privacy and Progress in Whole Genome Sequencing. Additional module sets on privacy and research design are also planned to accompany the Commission’s reports Privacy and Progress and Safeguarding Children.

All of the educational materials released by the Bioethics Commission are versatile and can be used in many ways to integrate bioethics into course curricula, discussions, and professional development activities. This versatility underscores the Commission’s commitment to advancing bioethics education across the academic curriculum. Each module includes background information, learning objectives, discussion questions, suggested additional readings, and practice exercises to support instructors as they develop their presentations. For examples about how one module might be used to reach different class audiences, check out our webinar: “Multidisciplinary Implementation of Bioethics Commission Education Materials.”

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are freely available at www.bioethics.gov/education. Feedback on the materials is encouraged at education@bioethics.gov.

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Bioethics Commission Staff Holds Multidisciplinary Educational Materials Webinar https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/04/28/bioethics-commission-staff-holds-multidisciplinary-educational-materials-webinar/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/04/28/bioethics-commission-staff-holds-multidisciplinary-educational-materials-webinar/#respond Mon, 28 Apr 2014 15:06:57 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1281 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethics Issues (Bioethics Commission) recently hosted a webinar entitled “Multidisciplinary Implementation of Bioethics Commission Education Materials.” In the hour-long presentation, three Bioethics Commission staff members (including myself) demonstrated how the Commission’s educational materials can be used in three different settings: a philosophy course, a biology course, and a law school lunch-and-learn.

Research Analyst Misti Ault Anderson opened the session by introducing the Bioethics Commission and its commitment to education throughout its work, and highlighting recommendations that call for education in three of its past reports. In addition, Anderson demonstrated how to access all of the educational materials, which are available for free download and use at Bioethics.gov.

Next, Senior Policy and Research Analyst Karen Meagher demonstrated how to use two of the Bioethics Commission’s modules—Informed Consent Background and Informed Consent in Privacy and Progress—in an existing undergraduate philosophy course. Meagher showed how an existing syllabus could be revised to include lectures and discussion about informed consent in genetic and genomic research.

Then, Anderson demonstrated how to use the same two educational modules in two kinds of undergraduate science classes—an introductory biology class and an upper-level research seminar. She highlighted the versatility of the modules, showing that teachers can adapt the materials to fit the level of the students.

Finally, I demonstrated the use of the same two modules to build a law school lunch-and-learn training session on informed consent for genetic research. I emphasized the importance of teaching ethics to law students and showed that the pedagogical materials are not stand-alone documents; instead, instructors can access additional materials from the Bioethics Commission, including its reports, to design workshops, exercises, and discussion questions.

A robust discussion session followed, with attendees from institutions across the country asking insightful questions. Participants asked about using the modules in other settings, including in secondary school, in a medical pharmacology course, and for clinical research staff orientation. In addition, the panelists answered questions about the importance of the Bioethics Commission’s educational materials and offered tips regarding how to get students and teachers interested in learning about bioethics.

A recording of the session is now available on the Bioethics Commission’s YouTube channel, bioethicsgov. There, you can also find a video of Commission Members discussing the importance of bioethics education, and another webinar hosted by staff on advancing bioethics education. All of the Bioethics Commission’s educational materials are available for free use at http://Bioethics.gov/education.

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