Speaking Engagements – blog.Bioethics.gov https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog The blog of the 2009 - 2017 Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues Mon, 09 Jan 2017 23:23:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Looking Back at the Bioethics Commission’s Blog https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/12/05/looking-back-at-the-bioethics-commissions-blog/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/12/05/looking-back-at-the-bioethics-commissions-blog/#respond Mon, 05 Dec 2016 16:00:04 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2125 Throughout its tenure, the Bioethics Commission has maintained an active digital presence to connect with a global audience. A major component of this has been through its blog. This final blog post reflects on the role the blog has played in disseminating the Bioethics Commission’s work.first-blog

Former Bioethics Commission Executive Director Valerie Bonham launched the commission’s blog on November 15, 2010, announcing that the staff would be liveblogging during Meeting Three in Atlanta. From that meeting onward, Bioethics Commission staff continued to blog live from the Bioethics Commission’s meetings, held throughout the country in cities including Washington DC, Philadelphia, Salt Lake City, San Francisco, Chicago, and Boston. Meeting posts highlighted salient points of discussion as they occurred during the public meetings. For example, during Meeting Three, a blog post outlined the members’ deliberations regarding the risks and benefits of synthetic biology. During Meeting Eighteen, which focused on ethical issues in neuroscience, a blog post highlighted some of the discussion about the ethical challenges in neuroscience research. The Bioethics Commission also used blog posts to distill complex topics that arose during meetings. During Meeting Twelve, which focused on pediatric medical countermeasure research, a blog post presented a simplified structure of some of the federal regulations concerning pediatric research.

The commission’s blog also highlighted and explained the impact of the commission’s work. For example, during the commission’s tenure, a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to revise the Common Rule—the regulations that govern the ethical conduct of federally supported human subjects research—was published in the Federal Register on September 8, 2015. Elements of the commission’s work were included in this notice. In September and October 2015, the Bioethics Commission released a series of blog posts that described some of the relevant inclusions in the NPRM, and explained their significance.

The Bioethics Commission also used the blog to share its outreach activities and initiatives with a broad readership. For example, when Bioethics Commission staff attended the annual meeting of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities in October 2015, a blog post highlighted the commission’s outreach efforts, and included answers to frequently asked questions that staff members fielded while at the conference. When the Bioethics Commission presented at the White House BRAIN conference, a blog post shared Executive Director Lisa M. Lee’s remarks. On June 8, 2016, Col. Nelson Michael gave an interview with the bioethics news site BioEdge, and the Bioethics Commission staff wrote a two-part blog post on some of the issues Col. Michael raised regarding democratic deliberation and ethics education. Blog posts were also written to describe publications in academic journals by Commission members and staff. A blog post shared a commentary written by Bioethics Commission Vice Ch
air Dr. James Wagner, who wrote about the importance of early ethics education.

During its tenure, the Bioethics Commission produced over 65 educational materials, and used the blog to picture1announce the availability of new educational materials, including user guides, primers, classroom discussion guides, and deliberative scenarios. Blog posts also helped outline how to use the educational materials. Blog posts also highlighted topics including innovations in ethics education, and the importance of civic engagement. The Bioethics Commission also used the blog to announce and promote its podcast series Ethically Sound, a 10-episode series that focuses on some of the ethical issues raised in the commission’s reports.
Readers can access previous blog posts, educational materials, the podcast series Ethically Sound, along with all of the Bioethics Commission’s reports and related materials at bioethics.gov. On behalf of the Bioethics Commission, we thank our readers for their continued interest in the work of the commission.

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Catching up with the Commission: Fall Conference Season Wrap-up https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/12/01/catching-up-with-the-commission-fall-conference-season-wrap-up/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/12/01/catching-up-with-the-commission-fall-conference-season-wrap-up/#respond Tue, 01 Dec 2015 16:42:13 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1765 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) recently ended a very busy fall conference season. Bioethics Commission staff members presented at major bioethics, public health, and specialty conferences across the country in order to promote the work of the Commission.

Former Bioethics Commission staff member Misti Ault Anderson kicked-off conference season at the International Conference on Science in Society, held October 1-2, 2015 in Chicago, Ill. Anderson gave a plenary address on the integration of ethics into science education to an audience of science scholars and professionals from across the world. The following week, Anderson traveled to Greenville, S.C. where she presented “Global Public Health Planning and Response Case Studies as a Teaching Tool,” highlighting the Commission’s new Ebola educational materials at the 17th International Conference on Ethics Across the Curriculum.

On October 16, the Bioethics Commission was back in Chicago for the International Neuroethics Society’s annual meeting. At this meeting, Commission member Dr. Daniel Sulmasy moderated the panel “Implementing Gray Matters: Perspectives on Bioethics Commission Recommendations.” Dr. Sulmasy was joined by William Casebeer of Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories, Debra Mathews of Johns Hopkins University, and Hannah Maslen of the University of Oxford for a discussion about the Commission’s report on neuroscience and the implementation of recommendations.

October 22-25, Bioethics Commission staff headed to Houston, Texas for the American Society for Bioethics + Humanities’ (ASBH) 17th Annual Meeting. The Commission’s Ethics and Ebola report was highlighted in the presentation “Ethics and Ebola: Bioethical Approaches to Global Public Health Emergencies.” The Commission’s work on neuroscience was featured in several presentations, including the panel “Considerations of Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society” as well as the paper “Neuroscience and Public Policy: A Responsible Path Forward.” In addition, Commission staff and Mark Hakkarinen of Georgetown University’s Kennedy Institute of Ethics discussed the communication techniques employed by the Commission in order to disseminate its work in the presentation “Public Bioethics in the New Millennium: Creatively Communicating the Work of the Presidential Bioethics Commission.” The Commission also had an informational booth with hardcopies of its reports available in the ASBH exhibition space.

Quickly following ASBH, the Bioethics Commission was at the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Tropical Medicine & Hygiene in Philadelphia, Pa. On October 27, Associate Director Kata Chillag moderated the conference’s scientific session on Ebola, where she also presented “Ethics and Ebola: Recommendations of the U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues.”

The Bioethics Commission ended October at the 2015 American Public Health Association (APHA) Annual Meeting, held October 31-November 4 in Chicago. Three staff members gave presentations during the roundtable on the ethical conduct of public health practice and research in challenging situations: Kata Chillag presented “Moral Distress among Public Health Professionals: Lessons from the West African Ebola Virus Disease Epidemic for Future Public Health Emergencies”; Karen Meagher presented “Feeling torn, tough choices, and troubled thoughts: The concept of moral distress”; and Executive Director Lisa M. Lee, who also moderated the roundtable, presented “Ethics and Ebola: Recommendations from the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues”. Copies of Commission reports Ethics and Ebola and “Ethically Impossible” were also distributed.

Finally, the Bioethics Commission closed out conference season at the Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R) 2015 Advancing Ethical Research (AER) Conference, held November 12-15 in Boston, Mass. On November 13, Commission Member Dr. Christine Grady and Commission staff Elizabeth Fenton and Kata Chillag presented “Clinical Research During the Ebola Epidemic: Recommendations from the Bioethics Commission,” highlighting the Commission’s research-related recommendations in its Ethics and Ebola report. The following day, Commission staff Elizabeth Fenton and Nicole Strand presented “A Dialogue with the Bioethics Commission,” providing insight into how a Presidential commission functions.

The Bioethics Commission has had a busy and successful fall season sharing its work with a variety of important stakeholders. Thanks to all who attended! The Commission is already looking forward to an equally successful 2016.

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Bioethics Commission Attends ASBH 2015 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/11/04/bioethics-commission-attends-asbh-2015/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/11/04/bioethics-commission-attends-asbh-2015/#respond Wed, 04 Nov 2015 17:36:57 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1742 Several staff and members of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) attended the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) annual meeting, held in Houston, Texas October 22-25, 2015. ASBH is a diverse organization of professionals and students engaged in clinical and academic bioethics and the medical humanities. Along with leading multiple sessions on Bioethics Commission work, the Bioethics Commission was pleased to host a booth in the conference exhibition hall. The exhibit featured Bioethics Commission reports, including its most recent reports, Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 1), Gray Matters: Topics at the Intersection of Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society (Gray Matters, Vol. 2), and Ethics and Ebola: Public Health Planning and Response. The Bioethics Commission also distributed “Ethically Impossible” STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948 and Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research. For others who were unable to attend ASBH, all materials are available for free download at bioethics.gov.

ASBH provided an opportunity to interact with colleagues from across the bioethics community; many attendees reported using our educational resources in their classrooms. The Bioethics Commission welcomes feedback and likes to hear how its materials are being used—if you have used our materials and are interested in sharing your experience, please email education@bioethics.gov!

The Bioethics Commission staff received many great questions at the exhibit. Here are some of the most frequently asked questions:

What is the Bioethics Commission currently working on?
The Bioethics Commission is working on a project on deliberation and ethics education. The Bioethics Commission stands behind strong democratic deliberation and enhancing ethics education. Throughout its tenure, Bioethics Commission members have modeled productive deliberation about a number of controversial topics. The Bioethics Commission has made a dozen recommendations about enhancing public and bioethics education, and the staff has produced a variety of educational materials based on report topics. This project on deliberation and education will be the Bioethics Commission’s capstone report, and will make recommendations about how these areas can mutually reinforce each other.

How does the Bioethics Commission choose the topics that it works on?
Topics come before the Bioethics Commission in two ways. The Executive Office of the President or a member of the President’s cabinet can ask the Bioethics Commission to study a particular topic or question and recommend an ethical way forward. The Bioethics Commission also can choose a topic based on pressing issues in the field.

How does the Bioethics Commission promote public bioethics?
All Bioethics Commission deliberations occur in public during its quarterly meetings. Anyone who is interested may attend these public meetings, or watch the meeting via live webcast at bioethics.gov. These meetings provide a unique opportunity to witness the live deliberations of a national bioethics commission—public bioethics in action. The Bioethics Commission welcomes input from anyone wishing to provide public comment on any issue before it, and is particularly interested in receiving comments and questions during meetings that are responsive to specific sessions. The Bioethics Commission’s next meeting will be held on November 17, 2015 in Arlington, VA. Written comments are accepted in advance of each meeting; please address written comments by email to info@bioethics.gov.

How does the Bioethics Commission disseminate its work?

As a part of its ongoing goal to educate the public and stakeholders about the Bioethics Commission’s recommendations, members and staff participate in many outreach events each year. In addition to discussing the findings of the Commission’s reports, the staff has produced a variety of educational materials based on report topics with the goal of making ethics accessible to a variety of stakeholders in both traditional and nontraditional education contexts.

What happens to the Bioethics Commission after President Obama’s term is over?
Like all federal advisory bodies, the Bioethics Commission must be renewed every two years. The Executive Order under which the Bioethics Commission currently operates has been extended until September 2017. However, if history repeats itself, it is likely that the Bioethics Commission in its current form will complete its work at the close of President Obama’s term in January 2017. At that time, it is also expected—though not guaranteed—that the next president will establish his or her own bioethics commission.

Thanks to all who stopped by our booth this year!

 

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The Bioethics Commission and Ethics Integration at All Levels https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/19/the-bioethics-commission-and-ethics-integration-at-all-levels/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2015/02/19/the-bioethics-commission-and-ethics-integration-at-all-levels/#respond Thu, 19 Feb 2015 17:15:58 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1573 This week, Research Analyst Elizabeth Fenton will present on behalf of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) at the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics Twenty-fourth Annual International Conference. The presentation is part of a four-day conference held by the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics (APPE), an organization founded to promote the advancement and teaching of practical and professional ethics. APPE’s annual conference has a number of different program tracks, including: bioethics, business ethics, environmental ethics, empirical ethics, media and journalism ethics, and research ethics.

Fenton’s presentation is part of the conference’s Bioethics track. Her presentation, “Bioethics Education: Presidential Bioethics Commission and Ethics Integration at all Levels and Across Disciplines,” highlights the Bioethics Commission’s pedagogical materials. Noting the need for improved resources to support ethics education, the Commission has committed to building a foundation of educational materials that can be used across a wide range of academic disciplines in a variety of settings using contemporary ethics issues. The educational materials produced by the Commission range from topic specific modules created to correspond to Commission reports, to primers for physicians, researchers, and patients; the Commission also offers Spanish translations for its materials related to its analysis of the unethical STD research conducted in the 1940s in Guatemala.

Fenton’s presentation will discuss the importance of integrating ethics into educational disciplines such as science, where ethical challenges frequently arise but where researchers might not have the skills or vocabulary needed to recognize or address them. Ethics integration promotes ethical conduct, professional responsibility, and engagement with the broader societal dimensions of research to enable thoughtful decision-making. The presentation will also highlight the need for further research to evaluate the best models for ethics integration.

“Ethics integration is very much a two-way street,” Fenton says. “It is a process in which experts in both ethics and science can become competent and literate in each other’s fields. When scientists develop a vocabulary for expressing ethical concerns, and ethicists have the scientific vocabulary to understand those concerns, both fields benefit.”

All educational materials developed by the Bioethics Commission are available for free on its website at www.bioethics.gov/education. Instructors are encouraged to access, use, and adapt the materials, provide feedback on their utility, and suggest improvements. We encourage comments or suggestions at education@bioethics.gov.

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PRIM&R Conference Update: Research Ethics and Incidental and Secondary Findings https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/12/11/primr-conference-update-research-ethics-and-incidental-and-secondary-findings/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/12/11/primr-conference-update-research-ethics-and-incidental-and-secondary-findings/#respond Thu, 11 Dec 2014 17:28:08 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1505 Recently, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) facilitated a didactic workshop session at the Public Responsibility in Medicine and Research (PRIM&R) Advancing Ethical Research Conference. This past Saturday, December 6, Bioethics Commission staff led the workshop IRB Primer: Incidental and Secondary Findings. The presentation provided an overview of the Commission’s recommendations regarding discoveries that lie outside the original aim of a test or procedure, and introduced educational materials to inform and support institutional review board (IRB) members, who often review protocols that include concerns about the ethical management of these findings.

Elizabeth Pike began with a brief introduction to the Bioethics Commission’s report Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings in the Clinical, Research, and Direct-to-Consumer Contexts. She emphasized the Commission’s main message: The ethical management of incidental and secondary findings requires that practitioners in all contexts anticipate and communicate. Practitioners should anticipate the incidental and secondary findings that can arise from a particular test or procedure and communicate how those findings will be managed to a potential recipient. She also noted the role of IRBs in reviewing research, and provided an overview of definitional issues, including what makes findings “incidental” or “secondary,” as well as the types of tests and procedures that commonly produce these findings.

Misti Ault Anderson then discussed the role of researchers. She highlighted various options researchers have to facilitate the ethical management of incidental and secondary findings, including informed consent processes, access to additional expertise, and opportunities to obtain participant preferences and disclose findings in accordance with these wishes.

Finally, Karen Meagher presented on the ethical considerations pertinent to IRB members when evaluating protocols in which incidental and secondary findings can arise. This overview included relevant ethical principles, such as respect for persons and beneficence, that IRBs can apply when evaluating researchers’ plans for ethical management of incidental and secondary findings. By considering a variety of options, PRIM&R attendees were able to envision multiple ways in which researchers can meet their responsibilities to participants, including different ways to establish clear communication.

In the second part of the session, staff members facilitated small group activities including the analysis of hypothetical research case studies involving large-scale genetic sequencing, testing of biological specimens, and imaging. Small groups considered the case studies, and reported out to the larger group about how researchers might design ethical protocols regarding the management of incidental and secondary findings, generating a lively group discussion. One attendee noted how IRBs also benefit from planning ahead, as thinking through difficult decisions before they arise is preferable to reacting after an incidental or secondary finding has been discovered, when available options might be limited or the timing of decisions more urgent. Session attendees enriched discussion by sharing their own past experiences and insights gained from a wide variety of professional backgrounds in research ethics.

By prompting audience consideration of the ethical issues that arise when considering research that might produce incidental and secondary findings, staff members demonstrated how professionals can make use of Bioethics Commission educational resources in support of important ongoing work in research ethics.

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The Bioethics Commission’s Neuro Double-Header https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/11/21/the-bioethics-commissions-neuro-double-header/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/11/21/the-bioethics-commissions-neuro-double-header/#respond Fri, 21 Nov 2014 16:14:51 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1495 Since President Obama’s April 2013 launch of the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has worked to ensure that ethics is an integral part of the conversation when discussing neuroscience. This past week, the Bioethics Commission was busy discussing its work at two annual neuroscience conferences in the Washington, D.C. area: the International Neuroethics Society (INS) Annual Meeting and the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) Annual Meeting.

Bioethics Commission Member Stephen L. Hauser, M.D., represented the Commission at INS on November 14, where he took part in the panel “The BRAIN Initiative & the Human Brain Project: An Ethical Focus.” Dr. Hauser was joined by fellow panel participants Walter Koroshetz, BRAIN Initiative, and Henry Markram, Human Brain Project, for a discussion on the ethical issues surrounding neuroscience research. Following the panel, each participant gave a brief interview for the University of Cambridge’s podcast The Naked Scientists.

“There are a whole host of issues that the Commission and society at large needs to undertake and tackle. These include such areas as brain privacy, particularly as our imaging tools become more sophisticated; cognitive enhancement; things like personality, sociability, violent impulses, etc.” said Hauser during his podcast interview. “What we need to have is a two-fold mission: first, to communicate clearly the true value of the therapies that we now have available; and second, anticipate and prepare for those that will perhaps be transformational but that are not yet currently available,” he explained. To listen to the full podcast, visit http://bit.ly/1xxVEmu.

The Bioethics Commission then went on to participate in SfN’s Annual Meeting exhibition, visited by more than 31,000 attendees. The exhibition, which took place November 16-19, 2014, allowed the Commission to discuss its role in the BRAIN Initiative and related reports. The Commission promoted the reports Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings, because so many neuroscience researchers often deal with these issues, and Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society, the Commission’s first of two reports in response to President Obama’s BRAIN Initiative-related request.

It was wonderful to engage with so many neuroscientists eager to discuss ethics over the past week!

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Bioethics Commission FAQs from ASBH https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/10/27/bioethics-commission-faqs-from-asbh/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/10/27/bioethics-commission-faqs-from-asbh/#respond Mon, 27 Oct 2014 15:35:15 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1458 Last week the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) attended the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) annual meeting, held in San Diego, California October 16-19. Along with leading multiple presentations, the Bioethics Commission was pleased to host a booth in the conference’s exhibition hall. The exhibit featured Commission reports as well as new communications materials. Several hundred copies of “Ethically Impossible” STD Research in Guatemala from 1946 to 1948, Safeguarding Children: Pediatric Medical Countermeasure Research, Anticipate and Communicate: Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings, and Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society flew off the table so quickly that we ran out of copies before the end of the conference’s second day. If you were not able to get a hard copy of your favorite report, all materials are available for free download on our website.

ASBH 2014 Booth

ASBH provided an opportunity to interact with many colleagues from across the bioethics community; many attendees reported using our educational resources in their classrooms. The Bioethics Commission welcomes feedback and likes to hear how its materials are being used, so if you have used our materials and are interested in sharing your experience, please email education@bioethics.gov!

The Bioethics Commission received many great questions at our exhibit. Here are some of the most commonly asked questions:

What is the Bioethics Commission currently working on?
The Commission is continuing its work on neuroscience. At its next public meeting on Nov. 5-6 in Salt Lake City, Utah, the Commission will be deliberating recommendations on neuroscience and related ethical issues. Gray Matters, Vol. 2, thefollow up to the May 2014 report Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society, is expected to be released in spring 2015 and will address important ethical issues related to applications and implications of neuroscience research.

In addition to neuroscience research and related ethical issues, the Bioethics Commission will begin discussions on its next topic – a self-directed topic – the role of deliberation and education in bioethics– at the November meeting. The Commission will focus on their symbiotic relationship as twin pillars of public bioethics: Education is required for informed deliberation, and deliberation enhances education at all levels.

How does the Bioethics Commission choose the topics that it works on?
The Executive Office of the President may ask the Bioethics Commission to study a particular topic or answer a particular question and report back; Gray Matters and “Ethically Impossible” are examples of two reports that came at the request of the President. In addition, the Commission may accept suggestions of issues for consideration from executive departments and agencies and the public, as it deems appropriate in support of its mission.

How does the Bioethics Commission promote public bioethics?
All Commission deliberations occur in public during its quarterly meetings. Anyone who is interested may attend these public meetings, or watch the meeting via live webcast. These meetings allow for the unique opportunity to witness the live deliberations of a national bioethics commission—public bioethics in action. The Commission welcomes input from anyone wishing to provide public comment on any issue before it, and is particularly interested in receiving comments and questions during meetings that are responsive to specific sessions. Written comments are accepted in advance of each meeting; please address written comments by email to info@bioethics.gov. In addition, the Commission posts regular updates to its blog—blog.bioethics.gov—and to Twitter.

How do you get to be on the Bioethics Commission?
Each Commission member is selected by the Executive Office of the President and serves for the term of the Commission.

Are there any staff employment opportunities available?
Currently there are no openings for staff positions. When opportunities come up, we post all of our vacancies on our website under Employment Opportunities.

How do I get in touch with the Bioethics Commission?
The best way to contact the Commission is via email. All correspondence is reviewed and logged. For public comments and questions please email info@bioethics.gov; for comments on or questions about educational materials please email education@bioethics.gov.

What happens to the commission after President Obama’s term is over?
Like all federal advisory bodies, the Bioethics Commission must be renewed every two years. The Executive Order under which the Commission currently operates expires in September 2015. Even if President Obama again extends his order and issues an additional continuance for the Commission, it is expected that this Commission, in its current form, will complete its work at the close of President Obama’s term in January 2017. At that time, it is also expected – though not guaranteed – that the next president will establish his or her own bioethics commission.

Where can I access reports published by previous bioethics commissions?
The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues is a separate commission from those established by previous presidents, and therefore does not maintain archives for previous commissions. Our website provides links to various archived material from past commissions, including some links to previous commissions’ reports. Most of these archives are maintained by either Georgetown University or George Washington University.

Thanks to all who stopped by our booth this year!

 

 

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Bioethics Commission to Offer Presentations at ASBH This Week https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/10/15/bioethics-commission-to-offer-presentations-at-asbh-this-week/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2014/10/15/bioethics-commission-to-offer-presentations-at-asbh-this-week/#respond Wed, 15 Oct 2014 19:16:14 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1452 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) is pleased to offer multiple presentations at the American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities (ASBH) Annual Meeting, scheduled for October 16-19 in San Diego, Calif. Over the course of the four day conference Bioethics Commission staff will highlight a number of bioethical issues, including bioethics literacy, incidental findings, and the integration of ethics into neuroscience research.

Executive Director Lisa M. Lee, along with Mildred Solomon, President and CEO of the Hastings Center, will present “Bioethics Literacy across the Lifespan” on October 17 at 10:45 a.m. According to Lee, the talk will focus on more than just ethics education. “Just like bioethics is multidisciplinary, bioethics education is also multidisciplinary. It is not just about a bioethicist teaching a scientist,” said Lee. “Everyone, from organizational leaders to primary school teachers, has a role in ethics education.” The talk comes on the heels of the recent release of the Sept.-Oct. issue of The Hastings Report. The issue, themed “Teaching Bioethics,” is co-sponsored by the Commission and highlights a collection of papers on bioethics education, the Commission’s newly announced project.

On October 16 at 4 p.m., Bioethics Commission Associate Director Michelle Groman, along with representatives of the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law, will lead the panel “Take it or Leave it: the Role of Bioethics Advisory Bodies in Effecting Policy Change.” The panel will use several case studies in order to examine how the features and structure of a bioethics commission, along with the political and social climate, can impact a commission’s influence on changes to policy and law. Jason Schwartz, a former Commission staff member and current research associate and lecturer in bioethics at the Princeton University Center for Human Values, will moderate.

In addition to Lee’s presentation, October 17 will feature a second presentation by Bioethics Commission staff. At 8 a.m., Research Analyst Nicolle K. Strand will present her paper “The Cost of Misinformation: Consumer Remedies for Misleading Genetic Test Results,” examining the potential legal solutions for consumers to respond to misleading genetic test results, and considering questions of compensation.

On October 18 at 11 a.m., Bioethics Commission Associate Director Kayte Spector-Bagdady, Senior Policy and Research Analyst Karen Meagher, and Executive Director Lisa M. Lee will lead the panel “Applying the Ethical Management of Incidental and Secondary Findings in Context,” moderated by Research Analyst Nicolle Strand. The panel will build on the Commission’s recommendations on the management of incidental and secondary findings, discussing staff work from philosophical, public health, and legal perspectives.

Finally, on October 19 at 8 a.m., Michelle Groman, Bioethics Commission Associate Director; Debra Matthews, former Bioethics Commission staff member and current Assistant Director for Science Programs at the Berman Institute of Bioethics; and William Casebeer, formerly of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), will lead the panel “Integrating Ethics and Neuroscience Research: Recommendations from the Presidential Bioethics Commission and Integration in Practice.” The panel will focus on the Commission’s recommendations for ethics integration throughout neuroscience research, as presented in its most recent report Gray Matters: Integrative Approaches for Neuroscience, Ethics, and Society. DARPA’s efforts to integrate ethics into neuroscience research, as well as the integration of ethics and science through all levels of education will be discussed.

With a busy schedule, the Bioethics Commission looks forward to an educational and informative meeting. Be sure to stop by our booth in the exhibit hall. See you at ASBH!

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