Public Bioethics – blog.Bioethics.gov https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog The blog of the 2009 - 2017 Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues Mon, 09 Jan 2017 23:23:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Ethically Sound podcast: Full series now available https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/11/23/ethically-sound-podcast-full-series-now-available/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/11/23/ethically-sound-podcast-full-series-now-available/#respond Wed, 23 Nov 2016 16:00:54 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2113 bioethics_twitter-v3-08Since the Bioethics Commission was established by Executive Order by President Obama, the Bioethics Commission has released 10 reports on a variety of ethically challenging topics, and has provided recommendations on topics ranging from synthetic biology and neuroscience to whole genome sequencing and public health preparedness. Over the last 10 weeks, the Bioethics Commission has released its 10-episode podcast series Ethically Sound, based on the work produced by the Bioethics Commission. Each episode in the series focuses on a particularly salient ethical challenge that was addressed by the Bioethics Commission, and illustrates how these ethical challenges impact our society. All 10 episodes of Ethically Sound are now available on our website.

Each of the 10 podcasts opens with an introductory vignette from a speaker closely associated with the topic, who recounts a personal or professional experience related to the ethical issues addressed in the particular report. Each episode also features an interview with a member of the Bioethics Commission, who describes how the Commission addressed the topic. Ethically Sound is hosted and narrated by the Commission’s former Communications Director Hillary Wicai Viers.

The Bioethics Commission has also released a new educational resource related to the podcasts, “Ethically Sound Discussion Guide: Podcast Series Discussion Questions.” This discussion guide is designed to facilitate classroom or seminar discussion.  The discussion guide, and all of the Bioethics Commission’s educational materials, can be downloaded for free and adapted for all levels of learners.

This podcast series is the Bioethics Commission’s most recent project aimed at bringing the Commission’s work to a variety of audiences. The Ethically Sound series is now available on our website, as well as on our SoundCloud, YouTube and iTunes pages. Listeners can follow the podcast using #EthicallySound or by following us on Twitter @bioethicsgov. The Bioethics Commission’s reports can be downloaded for free at www.bioethics.gov/studies, and the Commission’s educational materials can be accessed and downloaded for free at www.bioethics.gov/education. We welcome comments and feedback at info@bioethics.gov.

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Ethically Sound Episode 10: Charting a Path Forward https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/11/21/ethically-sound-episode-10-charting-a-path-forward/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/11/21/ethically-sound-episode-10-charting-a-path-forward/#respond Mon, 21 Nov 2016 16:00:01 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2052 The tenth and final episode of the Bioethics Commission’s podcast series, Ethically Sound, is now available. Today’s episode, “Charting a Path previewscreensnapz001Forward,” focuses on the Bioethics Commission’s two most recent public meetings, during which the Bioethics Commission reflected on the impact of past, present, and future of national bioethics advisory bodies.

Since the 1970s, the U.S. has had a succession of national advisory bodies to provide Congress or the President with expert advice on topics related to bioethics. Other countries also benefit from advisory bodies that provide advice about bioethi
cal issues. During its twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth public meetings, the Bioethics Commission heard
from members of past bioethics advisory bodies, representatives of international bioethics bodies, as well as officials who have been advised by such bodies.

The podcast opens with a narrative from Alex Capron, Professor of Law and Medicine at the University of Southern California. Mr. Capron chaired the Biomedical Ethics Advisory Committee from 1987 to 1990, and served on President William J. Clinton’s National Bioethics Advisory Body from 1996 to 2001. Mr. Capron presented before the commission during Meeting 26, and reflected on his experiences with both of these advisory bodies. In the podcast, Mr. Capron recounts a challenging experience he faced while describing the disciplinary backgrounds of bioethics advisory body staff to policymakers unfamiliar with the interdisciplinary nature of bioethics.

The podcast also includes an interview with Bioethics Commission member Dr. Daniel Sulmasy, Kilbride-Clinton Chair in Medicine and Ethics at the University of Chicago. The interview was conducted by Hillary Wicai Viers, a former Communications Director with the Bioethics Commission staff. Dr. Sulmasy discussed the importance of looking to past commissions, the legacy of the current Bioethics Commission, and the pressing ethical issues that we could face in the future. Regarding the importance of looking to past bioethics commissions, Dr. Sulmasy said “The past is applicable because many of the most basic ethical questions are perennial. We may encounter new problems, but the most fundamental questions about human finitude, the meaning of human progress, the role of balancing relief of suffering versus other ethical principles, questions of cost, and justice are always with us.”

Episode 10, and all of the other Ethically Sound episodes, is now available on our website, as well as on our SoundCloud, YouTube and iTunes pages. Listeners can follow the podcast using #EthicallySound or by following us on Twitter @bioethicsgov. Stay tuned for our upcoming educational resource, a set of discussion questions to accompany the Ethically Sound series that can be used in a classroom or seminar setting. We welcome comments and feedback at info@bioethics.gov.

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Introducing “Ethically Sound Discussion Guide: Podcast Series Discussion Questions” https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/11/09/introducing-ethically-sound-discussion-guide-podcast-series-discussion-questions/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/11/09/introducing-ethically-sound-discussion-guide-podcast-series-discussion-questions/#respond Wed, 09 Nov 2016 18:29:05 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2105 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has released a new educational resource, “Ethically Sound Discussion Guide: Podcast Series Discussion Questions.” safariscreensnapz001The discussion guide is based on the Bioethics Commission’s podcast series Ethically Sound. This 10-episode series is based on the 10 reports the Bioethics Commission produced during its tenure. Each podcast focuses on an ethical challenge the Bioethics Commission addressed in a specific report. Each episode opens with an introductory vignette from a speaker closely associated with the topic, and features an interview with a member of the Bioethics Commission.

The discussion guide includes a set of questions for each podcast designed to stimulate classroom or seminar discussion. The questions challenge students and those in professional training to think critically about why certain topics are important to consider, and how certain ethical challenges might be addressed. The questions are suitable for high school, undergraduate, and graduate-level students, as well as professionals in post-graduate training.

The discussion guide is the most recent addition to a series of educational materials designed to facilitate discussion around the topics addressed by the Bioethics Commission. Educators can access a set of classroom discussion guides to introduce students and professionals to the Bioethics Commission’s reports. Teachers and instructors can use our Guides to Deliberation to introduce students and those in professional training to democratic deliberation, an inclusive method of decision-making used to address open policy questions. Deliberative scenarios can help students and professionals use democratic deliberation to collaboratively address and propose a solution to a contemporary ethical challenge. Educators can use our user guides to find educational materials suitable for a particular field, discipline, or level of education.

All of the Bioethics Commission’s educational materials can be accessed and downloaded for free at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission welcomes comments and feedback on its materials at info@bioethics.gov.

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Ethically Sound Episode 8: Ethically Impossible https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/10/31/ethically-sound-episode-8-ethically-impossible/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/10/31/ethically-sound-episode-8-ethically-impossible/#respond Mon, 31 Oct 2016 15:37:38 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2045 Ethically Impossible,” the eighth episode of the Bioethics Commission’s podcast series Ethically Sound, is now available. Ethically Sound is based bioethics_twitter-v3-08on the 10 reports that the Bioethics Commission has produced during its tenure. The Bioethics Commission, established in 2009 by Executive Order, has addressed a wide variety of ethical challenges ranging from synthetic biology to neuroscience. This episode is based on the Bioethics Commission’s second report Ethically Impossible: STD Research in Guatemala from 1946-1948.

In what is now recognized as an infamous episode in the history of research ethics, the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) conducted unethical sexually transmitted disease (STD) experiments in Guatemala from 1946 through 1948. The Guatemala STD experiments were carried out with ongoing oversight by PHS and with the approval and engagement of Guatemalan government officials. The research involved intentionally exposing and infecting several vulnerable Guatemalan research subject populations—prisoners, soldiers, and psychiatric patients—to disease, without their consent. When these studies were revealed in 2010, President Barack Obama extended an apology to the President and people of Guatemala. President Obama charged the Bioethics Commission to conduct an ethical analysis of the research that took place, and to review current federal regulations to protect research participants. The Bioethics Commission conducted a thorough fact-finding investigation, reviewed more than 125,000 pages of documentation related to these studies, and traveled to Guatemala to meet with Guatemala’s own investigation committee. The Bioethics Commission’s report presents an unvarnished ethical analysis of the research studies that occurred, and concludes that these studies involved “unconscionable basic violations of ethics.” The Bioethics Commission’s third report Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research, addresses the second part of the president’s charge. The Bioethics Commission found that participants in federally-funded research studies were generally protected under current regulations, and recommended 14 changes to current practices to better protect research participants.

The podcast opens with a narrative from Dr. Paul Lombardo, Bobby Lee Cook Professor of Law at Georgia State University. Dr. Lombardo serves as a senior advisor to the Bioethics Commission, and traveled to Guatemala to help conduct this investigation. While recounting this experience, Dr. Lombardo said, “I returned to the United States with a more complete understanding of the meaning of the stories we tell about research ethics, not merely as a parochial academic concern, but within a larger historical frame where ill-treatment of research participants implicate the human rights of all people.”

The podcast also includes an interview with Commission member Dr. Anita Allen, the Henry R. Silverman Professor of Law and Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. Hillary Wicai Viers, former Communications Director with the Bioethics Commission staff, conducted the interview. Dr. Allen discussed why the Bioethics Commission conducted a fact-finding investigation, what the investigation entailed, and whether such morally reprehensible research could happen again. Dr. Allen said, “Going deeper into the history…was an important way for us to make sure that we [had] a complete historical picture of what had occurred, and also to increase our chances for understanding what we need to avoid, by way of research practices, moving forward.”

Episode 8 is now available on our website, as well as on our SoundCloud, YouTube and iTunes pages. In addition to this episode, listeners can access the first seven episodes of Ethically Sound. Listeners can follow the podcast using #EthicallySound or by following us on Twitter @bioethicsgov. Stay tuned for the ninth episode in our series, “Bioethics for Every Generation,” which will be available on November 7, 2016. We welcome comments and feedback at info@bioethics.gov.

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Ethically Sound Episode 7: Moral Science https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/10/24/ethically-sound-episode-7-moral-science/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/10/24/ethically-sound-episode-7-moral-science/#respond Mon, 24 Oct 2016 15:00:46 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2027 ethically_sound_moral-science-7-08Moral Science,” the seventh episode of the Bioethics Commission’s podcast series Ethically Sound, is now available. Ethically Sound is based on the 10 reports that the Bioethics Commission has produced during its tenure. Established in 2009 by Executive Order, the Bioethics Commission has addressed a variety of ethical challenges ranging from whole genome sequencing to public health planning and response. This episode is based on the Bioethics Commission’s third report Moral Science: Protecting Participants in Human Subjects Research.

In what is now recognized as an infamous episode in the history of research ethics, the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) conducted unethical sexually transmitted disease (STD) experiments in Guatemala from 1946 through 1948. The Guatemala STD experiments were carried out with ongoing oversight by PHS and with the approval and engagement of Guatemalan government officials. They involved intentionally exposing and infecting 1,308 person from vulnerable Guatemalan populations—prisoners, soldiers, sex workers, and psychiatric patients—to disease, without their consent. When these studies were revealed in 2010, President Barack Obama extended an apology to the President and people of Guatemala, and charged the Bioethics Commission to conduct an ethical analysis of the research that took place, and to review current federal regulations to protect research participants. The Bioethics Commission addressed the first part of this charge in its report Ethically Impossible: STD Research in Guatemala from 1946-1948. Moral Science addressed the second part of this charge. The commission found that the kinds of unethical conduct that occurred during the studies conducted in Guatemala from 1946-1948 could not occur under today’s federal protections for research participants. Federal protections generally appear to protect people from avoidable harm or unethical treatment in research conducted or supported by the federal government. However, the commission also found that there is room for improvement in how federally-funded research studies involving human subjects are conducted. In Moral Science, the Bioethics Commission presented 14 recommendations regarding various aspects of protecting human subjects in federally funded research.

The podcast opens with a narrative from Dr. Jerry Menikoff, the Director of the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP). Dr. Menikoff presented before the Bioethics Commission during its fifth public meeting, where he discussed the role of OHRP in protecting research participants. In this episode Dr. Menikoff shared how the protection of research participants became a central focus in his career, and recounted an eye-opening experience he had while serving on an institutional review board. Following the recollection, Dr. Menikoff said “Since then, making sure that people who are thinking about participating in clinical trials are given the information they need to make fully informed decisions has been an important part of my life’s work.”

The podcast also includes an interview with Bioethics Commission member Dr. Nita Farahany, Director of Science and Society at the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy at Duke University. Hillary Wicai Viers, former Communications Director with the Bioethics Commission staff, conducted the interview. Dr. Farahany discussed the importance of ethics education for researchers, and how new technologies will shape protections for research participants. Regarding new technologies, Dr. Farahany said, “It’s essential for that kind of research to continue to afford the same kind of protection to human subjects.”

Episode 7 is now available on our website, as well as on our SoundCloud, YouTube and iTunes pages. In addition to this episode, listeners can access the first six episodes of Ethically Sound. Listeners can follow the podcast using #EthicallySound or by following us on Twitter @bioethicsgov. Stay tuned for the eighth episode in our series, “Ethically Impossible,” which will be available on October 31, 2016. We welcome comments and feedback at info@bioethics.gov.

 

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Ethically Sound Episode 6: New Directions https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/10/17/ethically-sound-episode-6-new-directions/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/10/17/ethically-sound-episode-6-new-directions/#respond Mon, 17 Oct 2016 15:00:43 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=2012 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues bioethics_twitter-v3-08(Bioethics Commission) has
released the sixth episode, “New Directions“, in its new
podcast series Ethically Sound.  This podcast series is dedicated to bringing the Bioethics Commission’s body of work to a broad audience. The Bioethics Commission, established in 2009 by President Bara
ck Obama, has produced 10 reports, each of which focuses on key ethical considerations surrounding a particular topic. Today’s episode is based on the Bioethics Commission’s first report, New Directions: The Ethics of Synthetic Biology and Emerging Technologies.

New Directions was written in response to a charge from President Obama, after the announcement that researchers at the J. Craig Venter Institute had created the world’s first self-replicating synthetic genome in a bacterial cell. This news resulted in intense media coverage and hyped claims about the implications of this research. President Obama asked the Bioethics Commission to review the developing field of synthetic biology and to identify appropriate ethical boundaries that would both maximize public benefits and minimize risks. The Bioethics Commission considered a diverse range of perspectives on the direction and implications of synthetic biology throughout its public deliberations. Taking into consideration both the tremendous promise and the potential risks that could arise from developments in synthetic biology, the commission put forth 18 recommendations that outline important ethical considerations for synthetic biology. The recommendations include a call for increased federal oversight of research in synthetic biology, and a recommendation for incorporating ethics training for researchers in fields such as engineering and materials science, who might become involved in synthetic biology research.

The podcast opens with a narrative from Eleonore Pauwels, Senior Program Associate within the Science and Technology Innovation Program at the Woodrow Wilson Center. Ms. Pauwels shared her reaction to the announcement from the Venter Institute, and her perspective on how ethical issues would need to be addressed in this emerging technology. She said, “Today we still face an unresolved question: How do we develop a culture of inclusive public deliberation and decision-making that could guide integration of synthetic biology and all new technologies into society?”

The podcast also includes an interview with the Vice Chair of the Bioethics Commission and former President of Emory University, Dr. James Wagner. Hillary Wicai Viers, former Communications Director with the Bioethics Commission staff, conducted the interview. Dr. Wagner discussed the relevance of the commission’s report for current and future developments in synthetic biology, and how this first report set the tone for the rest of the commission’s body of work. Dr. Wagner noted that the ethical principles established in this report were foundational to subsequent projects, as well. He said, “We found ourselves in subsequent reports also recommending that there needs to be greater education in the area of bioethics, and education of our public to understand the current state of the art. We found ourselves coming back to those [ethical principles] over and over again in subsequent works that we did, whether it was work in neuroscience or work in genome sequencing.”

Episode 6 is now available on our website, as well as on our SoundCloud, YouTube and iTunes pages. In addition to this episode, listeners can access the first five episodes of Ethically Sound. Listeners can follow the podcast using the hashtag #EthicallySound or by following us on Twitter @bioethicsgov. Stay tuned for the seventh episode in our series, “Moral Science,” which will be available on October 24, 2016. We welcome comments and feedback at info@bioethics.gov.

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Introducing the Bioethics Commission’s New Educational Module: Community Engagement in Ethics and Ebola https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/07/13/introducing-the-bioethics-commissions-new-educational-module-community-engagement-in-ethics-and-ebola/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/07/13/introducing-the-bioethics-commissions-new-educational-module-community-engagement-in-ethics-and-ebola/#respond Wed, 13 Jul 2016 09:00:19 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1870 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has released a new module titled “Community engagement in Ethics and Ebola.” This module is designed to introduce the role and demonstrate the importance of community engagement in public health preparedness. The module builds on the work our most recent report, Bioethics for Every Generation: Deliberation and Education in Health, Science and Technology and the report Ethics and Ebola: Public Health Planning and Response.

The module, part of a series on community engagement, helps students, professionals, and interested individuals learn how community engagement can impact public health efforts, particularly during public health emergencies. The module includes the Bioethics Commission’s recommendations on community engagement related to domestic and international research, the collecting and sharing of biospecimens, and public health communication. The module includes questions and topics for discussion, as well as learning exercises that engage with real-life ethical scenarios.

This module begins by introducing community engagement. Community engagement modules are also available based on our work on synthetic biology, human subjects research protections, and large-scale genomic sequencing. We also have module series on compensation in research, informed consent, privacy, research design, and vulnerable populations, as these topics have been discussed throughout our reports. All modules are available for free download, and can be combined to create a course or incorporated into existing curricula as instructors or curriculum facilitators see fit.

Please stay tuned for information about forthcoming educational materials, including a series of educational materials about science hype in the media involving neuroscience, public health, and biotechnology.

All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

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Bioethics Commission’s New Recommendations Bolster Ethics Education https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/05/26/bioethics-commissions-new-recommendations-bolster-ethics-education/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/05/26/bioethics-commissions-new-recommendations-bolster-ethics-education/#respond Thu, 26 May 2016 10:40:00 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1855 The Bioethics Commission has encouraged and supported bioethics education throughout its projects and activities. Our educational materials, related to our reports, are tailored reach a variety of audiences. As the Bioethics Commission nears the end of its tenure, the capstone report Bioethics for Every Generation: Deliberation and Education in Health, Science, and Technology ties together these educational efforts. Among its eight recommendations, Bioethics for Every Generation included three that focus on improving bioethics education going forward.

First, early ethics education should build a foundation of ethical reasoning, literacy, and character formation. A solid basis in ethics will help children grapple with ethical choices far beyond the traditional classroom, such as how to be loyal to a friend or when, if ever, to break a promise. Those who develop curricula for ethics education should use evidence about childhood and adolescent moral development to inform their instruction, selecting questions and topics that are age-appropriate.

Second, in secondary school and higher education, bioethics education should become more targeted, and prepare students for particular ethical challenges that arise in health, science, technology, and engineering. Professionals should explore ethical questions alongside the technical dimensions of their fields, as critical reasoning skills and moral sensitivity help professionals grapple with the distinct ethical dimensions of their work.

Third, teachers and educational administrators need support, including professional development, to provide effective bioethics ethics education. Such efforts are likely to encounter understandable, but surmountable, obstacles. Among these include a hesitancy to engage students in questions of values, especially in matters that are likely to produce disagreement. Professional development can prepare instructors to overcome such obstacles. For example, training can prepare teachers to enlist support and address concerns of administrators and parents and demonstrate how ethics education is rooted in respect, does not seek to indoctrinate students, and cultivates critical thinking.

To assist educators in understanding the intersection of bioethics education and deliberation, Bioethics for Every Generation has an accompanying suite of educational materials, including deliberative scenarios that provide teachers and students with information on how to model deliberation in the classroom. All Bioethics Commission educational materials are free and available at www.bioethics.gov/education. The Bioethics Commission encourages feedback on its materials at education@bioethics.gov.

Bioethics for Every Generation and all other Bioethics Commission reports are free and available at www.bioethics.gov.

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Roundtable Discussion: Bioethics Advisory Bodies Past, Present, and Future https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/05/03/roundtable-discussion-bioethics-advisory-bodies-past-present-and-future/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/05/03/roundtable-discussion-bioethics-advisory-bodies-past-present-and-future/#respond Tue, 03 May 2016 19:09:11 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1836 The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) closed its reflections on the impact of national bioethics advisory bodies with a roundtable discussion involving Commission members and the day’s presenters.

Amy Gutmann, Ph.D., Chair of the Bioethics Commission, began the session by asking each panelist to articulate an important takeaway from the previous discussions about what the future holds for bioethics advisory bodies. She invited panelists and members to reflect upon what they would recommend to the next bioethics commission, in terms of either topic selection or structure/function.

Highlights from the discussion include:

Jason L. Schwartz, Ph.D., M.B.E., Assistant Professor of Health Policy and the History of Medicine at Yale University School of Public Health, talked about continuity between commissions, and how retaining their names might ensure a smoother transition and better continuity between administrations.

Nandini Kumar M.B.B.S., D.C.P., M.H.SC., Dr. TMA Pai Endowment Chair at Manipal University in India, emphasized the importance of including a member fluent in issues of international research, especially taking place in developing countries.

Tom L. Beauchamp, Ph.D., Professor of Philosophy and Senior Research Scholar at Georgetown University’s Kennedy Institute of Ethics, discussed the role of philosophy and philosophers in the conversations of bioethics advisory bodies.

Ruth Faden, Ph.D., M.P.H., Andreas C. Dracopoulos Director and Philip Franklin Wagley Professor at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics stressed that human rights and health should be emphasized by future bioethics commissions, as opposed to emerging technologies. She also referred to accountability and the importance of signaling independence and authority, helping to ensure that the government responds to recommendations by commissions.

Manuel Ruiz De Chávez, M.D., M.S., F.R.C.P. President of the Mexico National Commission of Bioethics (CONBIOÉTICA) focused on the importance of international cooperation between bioethics bodies.

Patricia King, J.D., Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Medicine, Ethics, and Public Policy at Georgetown Law said applied ethicists play a critical role in the discussions at this level, and emphasized the importance of passing on some of the institutional knowledge gained by this Bioethics Commission to the next one.

The next meeting of the Bioethics Commission, which continues this discussion, is scheduled for August 31 in Philadelphia, PA. For details, go to www.bioethics.gov.

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Additional Reflections on National Bioethics Advisory Bodies https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/05/03/additional-reflections-on-national-bioethics-advisory-bodies/ https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/2016/05/03/additional-reflections-on-national-bioethics-advisory-bodies/#respond Tue, 03 May 2016 18:14:52 +0000 https://bioethicsarchive.georgetown.edu/pcsbi/blog/?p=1832 The Bioethics Commission continued its discussion on the impact of bioethics advisory bodies, looking to the past to inform future efforts to address social and ethical dimensions of health, science, and technology policy.

In the second panel of the day, the Bioethics Commission heard from a variety of speakers considering the past, present, and future impact of such groups. Presenters included Tom L. Beauchamp, Professor of Philosophy at the Georgetown University Kennedy Institute of Ethics and Ruth Faden, Director of Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. In addition, the commission heard from Manuel Ruiz de Chávez, President of the Mexico National Commission of Bioethics (CONBIOÉTICA) and Patricia King, Professor of Law, Medicine, Ethics, and Public Policy at Georgetown Law.

Beauchamp shared insights gleaned from his time on the staff of the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research (National Commission) where he contributed to the delineation of foundational principles for research ethics in the Belmont Report. He discussed the enduring impact of the Belmont Report both in the United States and abroad, while acknowledging its limitations and reflecting on what national bioethics bodies should focus on in the future.

Faden spoke of her experience as chair of the President’s Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE). She described ACHRE’s charge and the nature of the issue that it was facing under the Clinton administration. Faden emphasized the power that a presidential commission has, serving as a “public pulpit to make a tremendous difference.”

Ruiz de Chávez talked about the importance of promoting the message of bioethics to the public, and the role that national bodies can serve in fulfilling that mission. He discussed the importance of an interdisciplinary commission and staff to advise executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

King reflected on her experience to two U.S. bioethics committees, as a member of the National Commission and ACHRE. She discussed what made the National Commission successful, including the fact that the federal government was required to respond to each of their recommendations, even if they did not take them up, and the fact that they convened at least once a month for over four years. She also discussed some of the features of the commission that she felt could have been improved, including a lack of sufficient disciplinary diversity, and what the members learned from the challenges that they faced during their tenure.

Stay tuned as panelists from the morning’s session return for a roundtable discussion with the Bioethics Commission.

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